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9/11: The World Speaks

In commemoration of the sixteenth anniversary of September 11th, the Furman University Libraries are highlighting the eBook, 9/11: The World SpeaksMore than four million people from across the United States and around the world have come through the galleries of the 9/11 Tribute Museum, formerly known as the Tribute WTC Visitor Center. A project of the September 11th Families’ Association, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, the museum began serving the public in 2006. Many of these visitors have written their poignant reflections about the impact of September 11th on visitor cards that are collected in the Museum’s final gallery.

For the first time ever, the book 9/11: The World Speaks brings together a choice selection of these visitor cards, many of which talk about the inspiration people find in the outpouring of humanity in response to September 11th. In seeing the selflessness of first responders and ordinary citizens who rushed to help strangers and friends on that day, and in the many months of recovery that followed, adults and young people write that they have been inspired to help others in their communities and around the world.

About the Author:  Lee Ielpi is a native of Great Neck, New York. Lee spent his career as a firefighter with the New York City Fire Department serving as a member of Rescue 2. Since losing his son Jonathan Lee Ielpi, Squad 288, FDNY, at the World Trade Center, Lee has dedicated himself to responding to the attacks on the World Trade Center with an eye towards making tomorrow a better day. He joined with the September 11th Families’ Association in November 2001 to represent the interests of the 9/11 community. In 2004, Lee along with Jennifer Adams co-founded the Tribute WTC Visitor Center.

Discovery by Design

Chrissy Hicks ’20 with Medieval music manuscripts in Furman Special Collections and Archives.

As Chrissy Hicks ’20 clicked play on her laptop, music that has not been heard for centuries filled the quiet study area in Furman’s Special Collections. The product of ten weeks of meticulous study and transcription, Hicks brought these original Medieval music manuscripts back to life.

Her project is part of the Special Collections and Archives Research and Creative Fellowships established this year with a gift from Furman alumna and retired librarian Carolyn Warden ’67 and her husband and retired chemistry professor Joseph Warden ’68.

Finding new things in remnants of the past is exactly what another summer fellow Emory Conetta ’18 set out to do. A studio art and art history double major, Conetta became interested in embroidery and its place in women’s history. She imagined how embroidery, as the medium for her senior show, could present the evolution of women’s issues in an unexpected way. When she found out about the opportunity in Special Collections, she began working with her faculty sponsor and mentor Sarah Archino, assistant professor of art, to develop a research topic.

Emory Conetta ’18 explored scrapbooks and yearbooks from Greenville Woman’s College students.

She pitched the idea to Special Collections Librarian & University Archivist Jeffrey Makala, and he suggested an exploration of the scrapbooks created by students of the Greenville Woman’s College in the early 20th century, the golden age of scrap booking for college students.

Read more about the journey of one of our Special Collections and Archives Research and Creative Fellows.

Hurricane Irma Impacts PASCAL Service

PASCAL Delivers Service Will Be Suspended Beginning Friday, September 8 at Noon Due to Hurricane Irma

Due to the anticipated impact of Hurricane Irma on member libraries around the state, PASCAL Delivers requesting will be temporarily suspended at noon on Friday, September 8 and will remain suspended through Monday, September 11. Courier service for the entire state will be suspended on Monday September 11 due to the anticipated impact of the hurricane.

We will continue to monitor the impact of Hurricane Irma on PASCAL institutions and will announce plans for the resumption of PASCAL Delivers service as soon as possible following the storm. Please check our website or follow us on Twitter for updates.

What is PASCAL Delivers?
PASCAL Delivers is a free, rapid book-delivery service provided by the Partnership Among South Carolina Academic Libraries which enables students, faculty and staff across the state to request and receive books from academic libraries in South Carolina. Over 12 million items are available in the catalog and books usually arrive within a few days!

Furman Faces

If you’ve walked into the Duke Library recently, you’ve probably seen the new display in the library’s foyer titled “Furman Faces: Pictures from the Bonhomie Yearbook.” This display (and all the foyer displays) was organized and executed by Nancy Sloan, Cataloging and Metadata Librarian. The photographs represent 116 years of student history from Furman’s time as an all-male Baptist college to the vibrant private liberal arts university we know and love today. To see more yearbook photographs, visit the Furman University Yearbooks digital collection.

Display of photographs from Furman yearbooks

Is this article peer-reviewed?

“Refereed” (also called “peer-reviewed) means that the articles in the journal are evaluated by a group of experts in the field. These experts must approve the articles before they are allowed to be published. These publications have a much higher level of scholarship and are far more trustworthy than non-refereed journals or magazines.

To help you make sure your articles are from peer-reviewed/refereed/scholarly journals AS you’re searching for them, many databases have limit options. For example:

refine your results

To confirm that your journal article is from a refereed/peer-reviewed publication AFTER you already have it, check Ulrich’s for the referee’s jersey symbol next to the journal title:

peer reviewed

In some journals, particularly those in the sciences, you can look for “submitted/revised/accepted” dates on the first page of the article. These tell you the dates the article went through the various steps of the peer-review process.

Finally, the most authoritative place to look is the journal’s website. Just Google the name of the journal. Look for a description of the journal that says “peer-reviewed” there. Also, look at the information for authors or review policy pages. These will often detail the peer-review process for each journal, including which sections of the journal are reviewed and which are merely edited.

Meet the Scholar of the Month!

Congratulations to Mary Kate (’18)! She is the lucky winner of the Scholar of the Month contest.  As Scholar of the Month, Mary Kate wins a private study room in the library for the month of September.
Perks of the Scholar of the Month room include:
• floor to ceiling dry erase wall
super-duper comfy chair
• large study table with 4 chairs
• bookcase to store your belongings
• access to a microwave

Would you like to be the Scholar of the Month in October? You can enter electronically by clicking the button below. One entry per person per month.

We will randomly select one winner from all entries on the first day of October and email the results to all who entered. The Scholar of the Month will also be announced on the library’s blog, Facebook, and Instagram accounts. Fine print: the Scholar of the Month contest is limited to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.  Sorry, Freshmen!

Past winners of the Scholar of the Month room include:

September 2015 Scholar of the Month – Yangbo

October 2015 Scholar of the Month – Meg

November 2015 Scholar of the Month – Megan

December 2015 Scholar of the Month – Sun

January 2016 Scholar of the Month – Gabrielle

2016_02_Thomas

February 2016 Scholar of the Month – Thomas

Jada

March 2016 Scholar of the Month – Jada

April 2016 Scholar of the Month – Joe

September 2016 Scholar of the Month – Daniel

October 2016 Scholar of the Month – Ann Marie

November 2016 Scholar of the Month – Catherine

December 2016 Scholar of the Month – Kristine

January 2017 Scholar of the Month – Sean

February 2017 Scholar of the Month – Allen

March 2017 Scholar of the Month – Chandler

April/May 2017 Scholar of the Month – Austin

Labor Day Schedule

In observance of Labor Day, the James B. Duke Library will be operating on an adjusted schedule:

Learn more about the history of Labor Day by visiting the United States Department of Labor website. Did you know that more than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers?

Discover Greenville Woman’s College

Greenville Woman’s College (GWC) was founded in 1854 on what is now Heritage Green in downtown Greenville. In 1938, it merged with Furman University, and in 1961 its campus closed down permanently. In the century it existed, GWC celebrated many unique traditions such as an annual May Day festival and pageant, and a rich history of writing postcards. You can rediscover some of these lost traditions and forgotten students thanks to the Greenville Woman’s College Yearbooks and Greenville Woman’s College Historical Images collection now available online. The Digital Collections Center partnered with the Greenville Public Library System to scan all the yearbook volumes in their collections (1901-1932). View Digital Collection.

Kracker-jack Kodakers, Greenville Woman’s College Yearbook, Entre Nous 1902. Furman University, Special Collections and Archives.

Mary Lokey, ‘Most Attractive Senior,’ 1931. Greenville Woman’s College Photo Collection. Furman University, Special Collections and Archives.

Carolyn Villarosa, ‘Most Old Fashioned,’ 1930. Greenville Woman’s College Photo Collection. Furman University, Special Collections and Archives.

Greenville Woman’s College Hikers Club, 1927-1928. Greenville Woman’s College Photo Collection. Furman University, Special Collections and Archives.

May Day, 1931. Greenville Woman’s College Yearbook, Entre Nous 1932. Furman University, Special Collections and Archives.

 

 

Happy Eid al-Adha!

by Krissa Stewart, Library Intern

Eid al-Adha is the second and holier of the two Muslim holidays celebrated worldwide every year. Eid al-Adha 2017 in the United States begins in the evening of Thursday, August 31 and ends in the evening of Friday, September 1. Called the Sacrifice Feast, Eid al-Adha honors Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son, Ishmael, as an act of submission to Allah’s command. Eid al-Adha is celebrated with the sacrifice of a ram, cow, or lamb using the Islamic rules of animal slaughter. The meat is then split into three different portions. One is given to the poor, another to family and friends, and the final portion is kept with the family who slaughtered the animal to be eaten at home. Muslims also participate in Eid prayers at their local mosque in a congregational setting.

CLICK HERE to win a study room for a month!

Wouldn’t it be nice to have your own private study room in the library?  For an entire month?  To share with friends?!  SUCH A ROOM EXISTS!  The library has created a private, upgraded study room reserved for the “Scholar of the Month” and their friends.  Perks include:

  • exclusive access to the upgraded study room for one month (think of it as your own office in the library!)
  • floor-to-ceiling dry erase wall
  • comfy lounge chair
  • large study table with 4 chairs
  • bookcase to store heavy textbooks, rain boots, S’well bottle, etc.
  • access to a microwave

Want to become the Scholar of the Month? You can enter electronically by clicking the button below. One entry per person per month.

We will randomly select one winner from all entries on the first day of the month and email the results to all who entered. The Scholar of the Month will also be announced on the library’s blog, Facebook, and Instagram accounts.

Say goodbye to hunting for a vacant study room. Say hello to privacy, comfort, convenience, and storage space!

fine print: The Scholar of the Month contest is limited to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.  Sorry, Freshmen!