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Republican Senator Nominated to Supreme Court

September 18, 1945 The prospect of a vacancy on the Supreme Court generally stirs speculation about which incumbent members of the Senate might be eligible candidates. Given the increasing contentiousness of the Senate review process for high court vacancies, some believe that selecting one of the Senate’s own members might smooth the road to a […]

The Senate Buys Jefferson’s Library

August 24, 1814 When the invading British army burned the United States Capitol building on this day, August 24, in 1814, they fueled the fire with 3,000 books from a small room that served as the congressional library. Among the Senate’s first orders of business, as it convened in temporary quarters ten blocks from the […]

Irritating the President

August 5, 1789 The Senate spent most of its first year setting precedents. During the month of August 1789, it established two precedents that particularly irritated President George Washington. On August 5, for the first time, the Senate refused to confirm a presidential appointee. Ignoring the budding concept of “senatorial courtesy,” President George Washington had […]

Freedom of Information Day

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION DAY 2018: LIBERTY AND OPEN ACCESS TO ALL On March 16, we celebrate the anniversary of former President James Madison. But that day, we also celebrate the legacy he and the founders of this country left us – open government. It is only natural that libraries, which promote open access to information […]

P.S. Remove the records!

When British troops began to advance toward the United States’ new capital of Washington in the summer of 1814, it was clear that government leaders had not prepared an adequate defense for the city and its government buildings. Upon seeing the British advancing toward Washington, Secretary of State James Monroe, dispatched a note to President […]

The Year of Intelligence

The first full year of the Gerald R. Ford administration is known as “The Year of Intelligence,” denoting a season of inquiry into America’s spy agencies set off by a wave of media revelations of official abuses and wrongdoing that predate the current era of media and congressional investigations by decades. Within the Central Intelligence […]

4th of July Hours

Due to the Independence Day holiday, the James B. Duke Library will close at 5:00 pm on Monday, July 3rd and will be closed on Tuesday, July 4th. We will reopen on Wednesday, July 5th at 8:00 am.  To help get your 4th off to a good start, here are just a few of the library’s […]

Achievements of a Heroic American Lady

The Furman University Libraries are providing a trial to HeinOnline until August 11, 2017. HeinOnline is a fully searchable, image-based government document and legal research database. It contains comprehensive coverage from inception of both U.S. statutory materials and more than 2,300 scholarly journals, all of the world’s constitutions, all U.S. treaties, collections of classic treatises and presidential […]

CLP & Corresponding Library Resources

Syrian Refugee Crisis – CLP WHEN   Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 7 – 8pm WHERE Johns Hall 101 The Syrian Refugee Crisis is one of the biggest humanitarian and refugee crises of our time, with over 4.8 million Syrian residents fleeing violence in their homeland and seeking refuge and safety elsewhere. This lecture is part of […]

National Hunting and Fishing Day

Over 100 years ago, hunters and anglers were the earliest and most vocal supporters of conservation and scientific wildlife management. They were the first to recognize that rapid development and unregulated uses of wildlife were threatening the future of many species. These early conservationists called for the first laws restricting the commercial slaughter of wildlife. […]