P.S. remove the records

When British troops began to advance toward the United States’ new capital of Washington in the summer of 1814, it was clear that government leaders had not prepared an adequate defense for the city and its government buildings. Upon seeing the British advancing toward Washington, Secretary of State James Monroe, dispatched a note to President James Madison.  It said that the British were pushing toward the capital, American troops were retreating – and they were outnumbered.  “The enemy are in full march for Washington. Have the materials prepared to destroy the bridges,” Monroe wrote.  And in a significant postscript, he added:  ”You had better remove the records.”

Monroe’s message set off a scramble among government officials to round up all the records they could.  The British surely would burn them if they reached the capital.  And so clerks packed such things as the books and papers of the State Department; unpublished secret journals of Congress; George Washington’s commission and correspondence; the Articles of Confederation; papers of the Continental Congress; and all the treaties, laws, and correspondence dating back to 1789.  Along with these early records, the clerks also bagged up the Charters of Freedom – the collective term for the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.  And so these three documents began a long journey as the War of 1812 raged.  The journey would not end until 1952, when all three were placed together, side by side, in special encasements in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

From:  Kratz, Jessie.  ”P.S.: You Had Better Remove the Records: Early Federal Archives and the Burning of Washington during the War of 1812.” Prologue 46.2 (2014)36-44.   Continue reading Jessie Kratz’s article in Prologue magazine about the numerous and perilous relocations of the Charters of Freedom.  Print issues of Prologue magazine can be found in the Government Documents Collection on the bottom floor of the James B. Duke Library.  

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.  There are hundreds of books relating to the subject of the Constitution which you may borrow from the library.  Many electronic books and streaming videos are included in the online catalog as well.  Listed below are just a few of the titles to be found:

The Constitution of the United States : with index and the Declaration of Independence / printed under the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing

Liberty, order, and justice : an introduction to the constitutional principles of American government / James McClellan

The genius of America : how the Constitution saved our country–and why it can again / Eric Lane and Michael Oreskes

The essential Bill of Rights : original arguments and fundamental documents / edited by Gordon Lloyd, Margie Lloyd

A brilliant solution: inventing the American Constitution/Carol Berkin

Forgotten founder : the life and times of Charles Pinckney / Marty D. Matthews

The summer of 1787 : the men who invented the Constitution / David O. Stewart

The Constitution in 2020 / edited by Jack M. Balkin, Reva B. Siegel

The Annotated U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence / edited by Jack N. Rakove

 

 

Maximize Reference Sources

Reference sources, particularly specialized encyclopedias, offer many benefits.  Consider the following tips as you review a reference source on your topic to reap all the benefits and make your researching even better.  

 

  • get definitions and background – Reference sources assume that you are new to a topic.  Jargon and specialized terminology will be explained and contextualized, which you might not get in more advanced books and journal articles.
  • get caught-up on a topic – Research is a conversation, and often it’s been going on for years.  Reference sources will provide a historical background and identify key developments to help you understand how we got to the current understandings and theories.
  • identify key people and theories – Who are the most important people and ideas on your topic?  Reference sources will help you identify them so you can explore them more deeply.
  • find more sources – Reference sources will provide additional reading, usually in the form of references or background lists.  These are a great next-step in your research process.

 

Please contact the Research Assistance Desk if you need help with your library research.  There are several ways to contact us:

We’re here to help you!

#SirWhatsHisName Rides a FitDesk

#SirWhatsHisName stopped by the library today to use a FitDesk.  Have you tried one yet?  Four FitDesks are located on the main floor of the James B. Duke Library.  Two additional FitDesks can be found in the Sanders Science Library.  

Studies have shown that increased blood and oxygen flow to the brain from exercise promotes the production of new cells and neural connections in the areas of the brain responsible for learning, memory, problem solving, and creativity. 

Exercise primes the brain for mental performance!

If you have a thinking-related task to do during the day – a presentation, a major meeting or a test – take 15 to 20 minutes to do some light exercise in the hour before the event. This exercise will increase the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the brain and improve your mental performance.  From:  Ratey, John. Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2013.


Borrow an iPad!

We’ve got gadgets!  The James B. Duke Library loans iPads and Kindles to current students, faculty, and staff.  The check-out period for electronic devices is 2 weeks, with a 2 week renewal if no one is on the waiting list.  You can check availability and place a hold on an electronic device by visiting the Circulation Desk or by calling 864-294-2265.  Check out our technology lending page for more information.

Swipe Your Card

Ryan Boyle’s Book

Furman Student Preps for the Paracycling World Championships

reblogged from Fox Carolina 21 updated: August 13, 2014 / by Dana Wachter

TRAVELERS REST, SC (FOX Carolina) - He was hit by a truck at just 9 years old, spending two months in a coma, and left virtually immobile. Now, just over ten years later, Ryan Boyle is a national champion cyclist, and has his eye on the world title.  

The Paracycling World Championships will be held in Greenville over Labor Day weekend. It’s the first time the worldwide race will be held in the U.S. in fifteen years, and with a Greenville-based coach, Team U.S.A. boasts three upstate riders.  

The rising Furman junior is the baby on the team. He’s come a long way since he said he was only able to move his index finger after his wreck.  Now, he uses cycling and strength training as his physical therapy, believing there are no limits to what he can accomplish.  Boyle calls cycling his “destiny.”  “I know how cliché that might sound, but, I love what I do, and I want to show the world what I can do, and what U.S.A. can do,” Boyle said.  

Boyle said his skull shattered when he was hit by the truck, and he spent two months in a coma. Doctors told his family they weren’t sure if he would survive. He did, but with his balance and movement greatly affected.  After months, and then years of intensive rehab, Boyle got into swimming and then staff at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta got him back on a bike, a hand cycle. He began competing with that bike and at a race in Anderson, he said coach Simon Bennett saw potential in him. He translated Boyle’s passion to the trike.  

“It’s a lot like a regular bike and I can compete on it and I can be a world champion,” Boyle said.  Just this summer, Boyle nabbed gold medals in Italy and Madison, Wisconsin, taking home national championships. He said he’s always looking forward to the next race.  

As the World Championships come to Greenville, he hopes having trained in the city, knowing its heat and humidity well, he can be at an advantage.  He hopes his success will inspire others never to give up hope.  Boyle studies communications in school and he wants to be a motivational speaker.  

He’s already written a book called, “When the Lights Go Out,” published his freshman year of college, about the path he’s taken, to get where he is.  Boyle said his USA team travels together, competes together and they cheer each other on. He called his teammates, “an ambitious bunch,” and that they all share similar optimistic personalities. 

The Furman Library currently has Ryan’s book on order.  Stop by the Circulation Desk or call 864-294-2265 to place a hold on the book when it arrives.  Be the first to read about Ryan’s amazing life story and cheer him on as he races this Labor Day weekend!

FitDesks in the Library

If I sweat, will my suit of armor rust?  Yes.  But if you’re sweating while riding a FitDesk, then you’re doing it all wrong!  That’s because light exercise, not a heart pumping workout, is all that is required to boost brain power.

Studies have shown that increased blood and oxygen flow to the brain from exercise promotes the production of new cells and neural connections in the areas of the brain responsible for learning, memory, problem solving, and creativity. 

Exercise primes the brain for mental performance!

If you have a thinking-related task to do during the day – a presentation, a major meeting or a test – take 15 to 20 minutes to do some light exercise in the hour before the event. This exercise will increase the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the brain and improve your mental performance.

Ratey, John. Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2013.

Four FitDesks are located on the main floor of the James B. Duke Library.  Two additional FitDesks can be found in the Sanders Science Library.

3 Library FAQs

#1.  How do I find peer-reviewed articles?

Most likely, your professors will require that you use peer-reviewed or “refereed” articles when writing a research paper.  Subject databases that specialize in your field are more likely to include peer-reviewed journals.  Many databases allow you to limit your search to peer-reviewed articles.  To confirm that your journal article is from a peer-reviewed/refereed publication AFTER you already have found it, search for the journal title (NOT the article title) in UlrichsWeb.  In the resulting list of records, look next to the journal title for the symbol that resembles a referee’s jersey.

#2.  The library doesn’t have what I need.  What should I do?  

We hope you don’t run into this problem too often, but if you do, the library offers a few options.  Use PASCAL Delivers when you need a book.  PASCAL Delivers transactions can be placed using your name and University ID Number.  Use Interlibrary Loan (ILL) for books that aren’t available through PASCAL Delivers.  AND use ILL services to request all other material types; articles, dissertations, CDs, DVDs, audiobooks, and sheet music.  Furman students, faculty, and staff who want to take advantage of ILL services must create an ILLiad account.

#3.  How can I find a call number in the library?

The Furman Libraries follow the classification system designed by the Library of Congress.  This system divides all knowledge into twenty-one basic classes, each identified by a single letter of the alphabet.  

To be able to efficiently read Library of Congress (LC) call numbers is quite a skill.  Let’s start with a sample call number:  LB2395 .C65 1991

 

Pirates in the Library

The FRADs were on a scavenger hunt today.  One of their clues led them to the library – “Engage, Enlighten, Empower is what we do.  Our academic resources are available just for you!”  Librarians at the Research Assistance Desk demonstrated how books and movies from the library’s collection can be used to create “Theme Nights” for their residence halls.  The pirate theme was a big hit!  Eye patches for everyone!  Snacks included: peg legs (pretzel sticks), shark bait (goldfish crackers), and cannon balls (Kix cereal).  Charlie the Pirate took part in several selfies.