Map Give-Away Over

The Library has completed the U.S. Geological Map project. Thanks to everyone who came over and took maps–the maps saw more action in the last two weeks than they had in the last 20 years!

Keep in mind that the Library has retained South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia maps. Please come and use them when you want to explore local areas. And for the other 47 states and territories, go to the US Geological Survey site.

My Beloved Mustache Hairs

Whenever I think of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, I always picture him with his thick, stylish mustache.  He must have been proud of his facial hair because he stored a few clippings in an envelope inscribed with “My beloved mustache hairs.” Someone must have loved his mustache as much as he did – the envelope of mustache hair sold at auction for $247.

Here are just a few of Doyle’s books that you can find in the library’s collection:

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Hound of the Baskervilles

My Friend the Murderer 

The Doings of Raffles Haw

World War I Centenary

On July 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were assassinated at Sarajevo, Bosnia, by a Serbian nationalist, touching off the conflict that became World War I.  Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia July 28, the formal beginning of the war.  Austria-Hungary was joined by Germany, the Ottoman Empire, and Bulgaria, to form the Central Powers.  Russia, France, Belgium, and Great Britain entered on the side of Serbia, forming the Allied Powers.  The United States remained neutral at the outbreak of World War I in 1914, though by 1917, it joined the Allies, helping to turn the tide against the Central Powers.  

The Furman Libraries provide access to a unique collection of primary source materials through the database First World War.  The wealth of original documents include:

This material is complemented by a range of contextual secondary features.  Use the Interactive Maps to learn about the extension of the conflict, explore significant dates and events of the Great War through the chronology and view fascinating visual images.

Portion of a letter written by J.A. Millen, a member of the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force, written to his wife in July 1918 mentioning the arrival of “Yankee troops.”

 

Summer Working Lunch:July 29

 

CTL, ITS, the Writing & Media Lab, and the Library present Summer Working Lunches!  

you bring:  your lunch and your work

we provide:  Moodle 2.6 training, assistance with assignments and research, the sharing of ideas with your fellow faculty members, and beverages

Tuesdays, 11 AM – 1 PM in the James B. Duke Library, Room 041

July 29

August 12

drop in; no rsvp required

Banker’s Hours

As hosts to the CBA/BAI Graduate School of Retail Bank Management, the James B. Duke Library and the Sanders Science Library will have altered operating hours from Sunday, July 20 – Monday, July 28.  But don’t let the idiom “banker’s hours” fool you.  These students will be working around the clock.  In fact, we’ve extended our hours to accommodate their needs.  The CBA/BAI program requires a significant commitment from students, who spend 10 days over three summers on the Furman campus.  Lectures are few and focused.  Each essentially prepares students for a daily immersion in the program’s signature offering: demanding, hands-on drills that push bankers to make critical decisions to a bank’s health.  Through the interactive exercises, students learn the core principles of successful retail and overall bank leadership.

James B. Duke Library
Sunday
July 20
1:00pm-5:30pm
Monday
July 21
8:00am-10:00pm
Tuesday
July 22
8:00am-10:00pm
Wednesday
July 23
8:00am-10:00pm
Thursday
July 24
8:00am-10:00pm
Friday
July 25
8:00am-5:30pm
Saturday
July 26
1:00pm-5:00pm
Sunday
July 27
8:00am-5:00pm
Monday
July 28
8:00am-10:00pm

 

Sanders Science Library
Sunday
July 20
closed
Monday
July 21
9:30am-5:30pm
Tuesday
July 22
8:00am-4:30pm
Wednesday
July 23
8:00am-4:30pm
Thursday
July 24
8:00am-4:30pm
Friday
July 25
8:00am-4:30pm
Saturday
July 26
closed
Sunday
July 27
closed
Monday
July 28
8:00am-4:30pm

 

Look who we found!

Look who we found!  Notable Autographs and Signatures in Special Collections

Exhibit Dates:  July 10, 2014 – August 22, 2014

Autographs and signatures have been favorite collectables in Europe from as early as the 16th century and in America from about 1815.  People have long sought to hold in their hands items that have been touched by figures of note.  Scientists, authors, philosophers, politicians, and artists have shared a celebrity culture with athletes, actors, and models.

It might surprise you to know that there is a difference between a signature and an autograph.  A signature is a handwritten and often stylized depiction of someone’s name, nickname, or other mark that a person writes on documents as a proof of identity and intent.  An autograph is chiefly an artistic signature.  Rather than providing authentication for a document, the autograph is given as a souvenir which acknowledges the recipient’s access to the autographer.  The collecting of autographs is known as philography.

This summer exhibition showcases autographs and signatures found throughout the many books and manuscript collections in Special Collections, with notable subjects who have connections to Furman, to the region, the state, or the nation.

Published in 1922, this book is the first volume of a 35-volume definitive edition of Mark Twain’s works.  In anticipation of the future publication, the publisher had Twain sign the fly-leaf for 1,024 sets in 1906, later to be bound with the first volume of every set.

Using tape recorded conversations and interviews with Andy Warhol, this book was written by Warhol’s ghost writer and personal assistant Pat Hackett and other Warhol associates.  This signed copy was purchased at the Andy Warhol Museum in his native Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and generously donated by a Furman professor.

Map Give Away

The library is deaccessioning our US Geographical Survey Maps, which are now available online. They are of every part of the United States and each one covers an area from 49-71 square miles. We are keeping South Carolina, Georgia and North Carolina, but all other parts of the country are available if you would like to come by. We are working on this project today (Friday, 7/11) and next week. Right now they are in perfect order but as we empty the drawers it will become harder to find specific areas. The map cases are located on the main floor to the right as you walk in.

Resources for Aspiring Physicians

If you are thinking about going to medical school, you probably have questions about how to prepare, apply, and choose the right school.  The Furman Libraries have several resources for aspiring physicians.

MSAR Getting Started: Medical School Admission Requirements  To help demystify the process and guide you through the steps necessary to successfully complete the application process, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has created this resource to help you along the way.  The Medical School Admission Requirements guides will provide you with the most up-to-date information about U.S. and Canadian medical schools so that you can make a well-informed decision about how and where to pursue your medical studies.  Location:  Reference Collection  Call Number:  R743 .M73 2014-2015

The Official Guide to Medical School Admissions: How to Prepare for and Apply to Medical School  Written and published by the Association of American Medical Colleges, this guide is packed with crucial information on how to make yourself a better prepared and more attractive applicant, and everything about the entire admissions process.  You get details about the MCAT exam, how admissions decisions are made, and information on diversity in medical schools, financing, applicant and matriculant data, and more.  Location:  Reference Collection  Call Number:  R743 .M73 2014

MCAT 45 (2013)  A student’s medical college admission test score is one of the most important factors considered by the medical school admissions committee.  Competitive students seeking admission to top medical schools need high MCAT scores, and therefore the most intensive MCAT practice available.  Kaplan MCAT 45 features the toughest practice, strongest strategies, and the hardest questions on the MCAT.  Location:  Sanders Science Library Reserves

“Reading is not optional.”

Walter Dean Myers, an award-winning author known for writing books about young African Americans, passed away on July 1 at the age of 76.  Myers, who was named the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature 2012-2013, often spoke at schools and libraries promoting literacy with his motto ”Reading is not optional.”   The library’s collection includes 28 of Mr. Myers’ titles.  Many of these books are currently on display in the James B. Duke Library.  We hope you will drop in, check out a book, and spread the message of Walter Dean Myers – “Reading is not optional.”

 

 

Cursive Is an Endangered Species

reblogged from The Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog, “The Conversation”

original post date:  June 27, 2014  by Valerie Hotchkiss

Cursive Is an Endangered Species

Over the past decade or so, something big has been happening in public schools throughout the United States.  Instruction in cursive writing has all but disappeared, cut from curricula as schools bring more technology (and keyboarding) into the classroom.  The new Common Core Standards for education omit training in cursive handwriting altogether.  Even in the few schools where cursive is still taught, the subject is often covered in one year and writing in cursive is not required thereafter.  Many young people entering college cannot write or read cursive.  Indeed, many cannot even sign their name in traditional cursive.

In the Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, we have begun to see the ramifications of this shift and its effect on the research skills of college students.  Recently, an undergraduate asked me for help with a manuscript she was studying.  I assumed it was something along the lines of a medieval Latin text or perhaps even a particularly difficult Marcel Proust letter (our library holds the largest collection of Proust letters in the world), but when I bent over the letter to help, I saw that it was in English and in the very neat, clear hand of John Ruskin.  ”What’s the problem?” I asked.

“Oh, I don’t do cursive,” answered the undergraduate.

We are now faced with a generation of students who don’t “do” cursive.  Unfortunately, this means that they will be locked out of doing research with literary papers and archival collections.  They will not even be able to read their grandmother’s diary or their parents’ love letters.  An informal survey of rare-book librarians and archivists indicates that our experience at Illinois is not uncommon.  Research on manuscripts from the 17th to the 20th century is no longer possible for most undergraduates at American colleges.  When the ability to read cursive disappears, our connection to history – and even to our own past – is lost.

Instead of merely bemoaning the decline of cursive, the Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Illinois is doing something about it.  This summer, we will offer “Camp Cursive” for 8-to-11 year-olds, teaching the letter forms and practicing by reading manuscripts by famous authors.  Special Collections libraries may not seem like the most obvious place for the 8-to-11 crowd, but as the caretakers of primary sources we feel that we must do something.  If our educational system produces another generation of students unable to read cursive, miles of archival documents and literary papers will go unread and unstudied.

The benefits of cursive, however, go far beyond historical research.

Neuroscientists have found that the act of writing by hand builds neural pathways that directly affect a wide range of development, including language fluency, memory, physical coordination, and socialization.  Researchers such as Steve Peverly of Columbia University and Virginia W. Berninger of the University of Washington have discovered close connections between writing and cognitive development.  Peverly, for example, has shown that students’ attention span improves significantly when they take notes by hand as opposed to clicking away on their keyboards.  And those who can write more swiftly retain the information better.  Since connecting letters increases the speed at which one writes, we can infer that cursive note taking would be most beneficial for academic success.

At the University of Illinois, registration for our “Camp Cursive” filled up as soon as it was announced.  Activities during the camp will include lessons in developing one’s own signature, a short course in handwriting analysis, writing cursive on the campus plaza with sidewalk chalk, courses in the history of writing implements, mixing up recipes for invisible ink, and a “cursed cursive” contest in which students compete to concoct their best Shakespearean curse before writing it elegantly in cursive on the blackboard.  The prize?  A fountain pen, of course!

Valerie Hotchkiss is a professor and director of the Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.