The Abode of Peace

Brunei, or Brunei Darussalam (Abode of Peace), became an independent nation on 1 January 1984. Once a sprawling empire but threatened with extinction in the nineteenth century, this tiny state of 2,226 square miles on the northern portion of the island of Borneo survived under British protection from 1888 until independence.

Singh, D. S. Ranjit. “Brunei.” The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World. : Oxford University Press, 2001. Oxford Reference. 2004. Date Accessed 29 Jul. 2015

Continue reading: The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World

Location of Brunei (green) in ASEAN (dark grey).  Image by ASDFGHJ, via Wikimedia Commons.

Location of Brunei (green) in ASEAN (dark grey). Image by ASDFGHJ, via Wikimedia Commons.

Is it peer-reviewed?

“Refereed” (also called “peer-reviewed) means that the articles in the journal are evaluated by a group of experts in the field. These experts must approve the articles before they are allowed to be published. These publications have a much higher level of scholarship and are far more trustworthy than non-refereed journals or magazines.

To help you make sure your articles are from refereed/scholarly journals AS you’re searching for them, many databases have limit options. For example:

refine your results

To confirm that your journal article is from a refereed/peer-reviewed publication AFTER you already have it, check Ulrich’s for the referee’s jersey symbol next to the journal title:

peer reviewed

In some journals, particularly those in the sciences, you can look for “submitted/revised/accepted” dates on the first page of the article. These tell you the dates the article went through the various steps of the peer-review process.

Finally, the most authoriative place to look is the journal’s website. Just Google the name of the journal. Look for a description of the journal that says “peer-reviewed” there. Also, look at the information for authors or review policy pages. These will often detail the peer-review process for each journal, including which sections of the journal are reviewed and which are merely edited.

Historical Marker Dedication

A South Carolina Historical Marker for the birthplace and boyhood home of Dr. John L. Plyler in Travelers Rest was dedicated on Saturday, July 18. The house is located at 302 N. Main Street in Travelers Rest, and the marker is located across the street on the Swamp Rabbit Trail. A representative of the Travelers Rest Historical Museum suggested the idea of marking this house in 2012.  Furman University’s Special Collections and Archives worked with the South Carolina Department of Archives and History to bring the project to fruition.

Dedication 1Dedication 2

John Robert and Mary Earle Plyler home, Travelers Rest, 1893

John Robert and Mary Earle Plyler home, Travelers Rest, 1893

Plyler Home2
The house is located at 302 N. Main Street .

Bankers’ Hours

As Furman hosts the Consumer Bankers Association Executive Banking School, the James B. Duke Library and the Sanders Science Library have altered operating hours from Sunday, July 19 – Thursday, July 30. But don’t let the idiom “bankers’ hours” fool you. These students will be working around the clock. In fact, we’ve extended our hours to accommodate their needs. The CBA program requires a significant commitment from students, who spend 10 days over three summers on the Furman campus. Lectures are few and focused. Each essentially prepares students for a daily immersion in the program’s signature offering: demanding, hands-on drills that push bankers to make critical decisions to a bank’s health. Through the interactive exercises, students learn the core principles of successful retail and overall bank leadership.

James B. Duke Library

Sunday

July 19

1:00pm-5:00pm

Monday

July 20

8:00am-10:00pm

Tuesday

July 21

8:00am-10:00pm

Wednesday

July 22

8:00am-10:00pm

Thursday

July 23

8:00am-10:00pm

Friday

July 24

8:00am-5:00pm

Saturday

July 25

1:00pm-5:00pm

Sunday

July 26

7:45am-5:00pm

Monday

July 27

7:45am-10:00pm

Tuesday

July 28

7:45am-10:00pm

Wednesday

July 29

8:00am-10:00pm

Thursday

July 30

8:00am-10:00pm

 

Sanders Science Library

Sunday

July 19

4:00pm-7:00pm

Monday

July 20

9:30am-5:30pm

Tuesday

July 21

9:30am-5:30pm

Wednesday

July 22

9:30am-5:30pm

Thursday

July 23

7:30am-4:30pm

Friday

July 24

7:30am-4:30pm

Saturday

July 25

closed

Sunday

July 26

7:30am-12:30pm

Monday

July 27

7:30am-4:30pm

Tuesday

July 28

7:00am-4:30pm

Wednesday

July 29

9:30am-4:30pm

Thursday

July 30

9:30am-4:30pm

Bonhomie Online (1901-1970)

The Furman University Libraries’ Digital Collections Center recently added the years 1961-1970 to the online collection of Bonhomie yearbooks. This latest batch of yearbooks is especially meaningful, because it covers the Civil Rights Era and the integration of Furman University. You can see numerous photographs of Joe Vaughn (the first African-American undergraduate student) starting in the 1966 yearbook.

This growing collection will ultimately contain digitized copies of all the Furman University and Greenville Woman’s College yearbooks. Currently, the collection includes the Furman University Bonhomie yearbooks, dating 1901 – 1970.

1968 Bonhomie page 154

Images from the 1968 Bonhomie. The caption reads: For the students, however, the library is much more than just a center of scholarly materials. It is a place to go to get away from people or to get together with people, to collect one’s thoughts or to quietly exchange ideas, to read the paper from home you can’t afford to take, to find the graduate catalogue you need, or to look up the author of your parallel book before supper. It is a frustrating place to be sometimes, especially if the book you want is on the second floor and you’re downstairs, but it’s also the place to go if you’re frustrated by an assignment that is just too hard.

1968 Bonhomie

The Bonus Army

Bonus Army 1
Bonus Army veterans battle with Washington, D.C. police officers at one of their camps. The abandoned Treasury Department building, occupied by members of the Bonus Army, can be seen in the background. 1932. (Underwood Archives\Universal Images Group) Photograph courtesy of ImageQuest database.

From The American Century: A History of the United States Since the 1890s/LaFeber, Walter; Polenberg, Richard; Woloch, Nancy

The bonus issue had originated in 1924 when Congress, over Coolidge’s veto, promised a bonus of several hundred dollars (depending on length of military service) to World War I veterans, but deferred payment until 1945. By 1932, however, many unemployed veterans wanted to be paid immediately, since they considered the money rightfully theirs and desperately needed it. When Congress took up a bill providing immediate payment, 15,000 veterans (some accompanied by their wives and children) converged on Washington, D.C. to lobby for passage. They set up camp on the lawn of the Capital, occupied an abandoned Treasury Department building, and built a “Hooverville” across the Anacostia River. They became known as the Bonus Army.

The veterans aroused considerable sympathy, but the Hoover administration believed the case against them to be overwhelming: payment of the bonus would wreck hopes for a balanced budget, give preferential treatment to veterans over other needy citizens, and entitle those veterans who were well-off to payment at a time of declining tax revenues.

Although the House passed the bonus bill, the Senate rejected the measure on June 17, 1932 by a large margin. The presence of the Bonus Army embarrassed and frightened the Hoover administration. Ultimately the government increased its pressure on the veterans, demanding that they leave.  The evacuation led to a scuffle with the local police in which two veterans were killed. On July 28, 1932, General Douglas MacArthur led cavalry and infantry troops, as well as a mounted machine-gun squadron down Pennsylvania Avenue. With bayonets and tear gas, the soldiers forced the veterans out of the business district and across the bridge to Anacostia and then set fire to the encampment.

Bonus Army in Washington, D.C.

Films on Demand video/WPA Film Library, 1932

Capital Grounds

World War I veterans, who are members of the Bonus Army, bed down for the night on the Capitol grounds. Washington, D.C., 1932. (Underwood Archives\Universal Images Group) Photograph courtesy of ImageQuest database.

Bonus Army 2

Soldiers in gas masks advance on World War I Bonus March demonstrators in Washington, D.C., July 1932. (Photo by Jack Benton/Getty Images) Photograph courtesy of ImageQuest database.

Straight Talk SC

The Riley Institute and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute have partnered to bring to the Greenville community the annual Riley/OLLI Summer Series. This year marks the fifth annual summer series, Straight Talk SC, which takes place 6:30 – 8:30, Tuesday evenings, July 21 – August 11 in the Younts Conference Center on the Furman University campus. The program includes high-profile speakers, academicians, and those who have on-the-ground experience with issues and topics of interest to Americans, and, in particular, South Carolinians.

This year’s summer series, “Crime and Punishment: Thinking Outside the Cell,” will explore our system of criminal justice–why and how it’s broken; what our state legislature has done/is doing/can do; law enforcement and the communities they serve; prisons and the treatment of mentally ill; problem-solving courts and other innovative approaches to improving public safety; and building justice in our communities.

Click on the image below for information on speakers and topics for this timely and relevant series.

Straight Talk SC

Audiobook Extravaganza

I Am MalalaGirl on the TrainDead Wake 2

YES, it’s an audiobook avalanche!  We received a wonderful donation of mysteries and thrillers by authors such as Baldacci, Grafton and Patterson. We’ve got a little horror by Dean Koontz and new horror by Neil Gaiman. We’ve got new fiction by bestselling authors like Kate Atkinson, Dennis Lehane, and Kazuo Ishiguro. And you may not remember the authors but we’ve got The Fifth Gospel by Ian Caldwell (remember The Rule of Four?) and The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins (they say it’s better than Gone Girl. What? you didn’t read Gone Girl? we have it on audio too!)

Not into fiction? We’ve got autobiographies by Chris Kyle, “American Sniper” and Malala Yousafzai, “I am Malala.” How about Erik Larsen’s latest, Dead Wake, about the last sailing of the Lusitania? Presidents? Woe to James Garfield, in Candice Millard’s Destiny of the Republic (murdered?) We’ve got biographies on Coolidge, Johnson, Madison, Jefferson, and Cronkite. Oh, wait, Walter Cronkite wasn’t president, but he was the most trusted man in America. We have his biography too!

Controversy? Stephen Mansfield’s The Mormonizing of America: how the Mormon Religion Became a Dominant Force in Politics, Entertainment, and Pop Culture? Stephen Covey…Mormon. Stephenie Meyer, author of the Twilight book series…Mormon. The Osmonds…you already knew that. But Glenn Beck? Mormon. Garry Wills has Why Priests?: a Failed Tradition. We’ve even got Guided Mindfulness Meditation by Jon Kabat-Zinn for those days when you need to, well, meditate.

Check out our Pinterest boards for availability and other titles or, even better, stop by your JBD library. See you soon!

https://www.pinterest.com/furmanlibraries/july-2015-audiobooks-fiction/

https://www.pinterest.com/furmanlibraries/july-2015-audiobooks-nonfiction/

Furman Cougar Project

Furman Cougar Project

The Digital Collections Center is pleased to announce the newest collection to be migrated into CONTENTdm: The Furman Cougar ProjectThe Furman Cougar Project began in 2008 as an effort to monitor and research cougars in south-central New Mexico. Each summer Furman University Biology professor, Dr. Travis Perry, and his students travel to Sierra County, New Mexico to photograph and track the large wild cats. The research team sets up a grid of cameras in key locations that are programmed to snap a photograph of any movement. The cameras help the team identify potential locations of the cougars. When a cougar is located, the team then safely captures, tags, and collars it with a GPS locator. In this way, they are able to track the movements and hunting patterns of the cougars.

This digital collection contains more than just pictures of cougars, however. Because the cameras are set to photograph every movement, there are images of a wide assortment of wildlife. There are over 3,500 digital images showcasing everything from skunks, to bears, to bats. We hope to work with Dr. Perry in 2016 to add additional photographs to this collection. In the meantime, enjoy a few highlights from the digital collection:

Golden Eagle

Cougar

Turkey Vulture

Mule Deer

Bobcat

American Black Bear

Pallid Bat

Greater Roadrunner

Striped Skunk

Wild Turkey